Reviews and expert opinion LogoMaker

Ranked 29th from 31 Logo Design Services
3.0
Pricing
Basic $39.95
Premium $59.9
Ezequiel Bruni
Ezequiel Bruni
Graphic Designer
It’s not the worst logo maker out there, but that’s not exactly a ringing endorsement, is it? It makes me sad because it has a lot of the right ideas, just mediocre execution. You’d be better off grabbing a logo from any number of their competitors.

Overview

LogoMaker

There Are Good Ideas Here, but It’s Pretty Dated

Ah, LogoMaker, the logo maker platform that forced all other logo makers to use any other name. That’s pretty much the one big advantage it has. It was launched in 2004, and the website looks like it might have been designed a few years earlier.

It’s available in English, German, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Italian, Turkish, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, and Dutch, and you can design your logo in those same languages. Other services include business card design, printing your logo on promotional items, and websites.

You can buy a logo for an affordable one-time payment. If only LogoMaker offered a better product like its competitors, Wix Logo Maker and Looka.

Look, I don’t want to be mean. This isn’t a takedown like I wrote about Smashinglogo. This is the sad tale of a service that was probably really good for its time, but I can’t recommend it now.

In this series of reviews, I’m testing all the biggest logo design platforms in an attempt to find the best new logo for Website Planet. Click here to read all about my experiences and find out who won, or read on to find out why LogoMaker is not the winner.

Features

2.0
LogoMaker

It’s Pretty Decent, except for the Actual Logos

Yeah, LogoMaker has a logo problem. I’ll explain below.

The first thing to note is that LogoMaker isn’t an AI-based logo generation service: it’s a customizable logo library, with no AI involved at all. The library is searchable and can be filtered reasonably well, but it’s a library with no brain behind it (pun not entirely intended).

The step-by-step wizard is really just a primary filter to help you narrow down your choices. As such, it’s short and sweet and throws you headfirst into the logo library. Fortunately, the results I had were reasonably relevant. Now, how many icons you get to choose from depends on how many it has for the keywords you specify. You’ll get more results for “design” than for “armadillo husbandry,” and that’s just how it goes.

Side note: there’s exactly one icon that features an armadillo, and a couple of abstract-shape-based logos that might sort of work.

Once you’ve got the logo of your dreams (this time I can’t even write that with a straight face, sorry), it’s time to customize it. Thankfully, you can drag and drop your company name, tagline, and icon anywhere you like. You can also use any color you like, both for the text and for individual shapes in your logo. That kind of customization is thorough, and I like that.

There doesn’t seem to be any support for gradients, but you can get your logo with a transparent background. There’s no animation.

In the end, you could probably create a logo that is awfully close to unique, or uncommon. But… it’s not going to feel all that unique. This is where I, sadly, have to report that the vast majority of the logo templates—in particular, the icons—look dated, generic, and generally mediocre at best. As I say in the video, the best look sort of like good clipart, and the worst like very old clipart.

Or to put it another way, most of them look like they come from the early ‘90s and the Dot-Com Bubble, and the newer-looking ones might come from the Web 2.0 era (that period of like, five years when everything on the internet used super shiny-looking graphics, and everyone was getting into social media).

You can get these okay-looking-at-best logos in JPG, PNG, SVG (infinitely scalable), EPS (infinitely scalable), PDF, and even PSD (Photoshop) formats. That bit is something I actually like.

It Has over 10,000 Logo Templates

I can’t say with certainty that none of the logo templates are good. In 10,000 templates, there has to be something worth using, even if it will look a little dated. That said, the non-icon templates are usually a little better (i.e., the logos that are pure text, or have sort of a “badge” style going). If you don’t need an icon, LogoMaker does have some decent enough options to play around with.

Examples of badge-style logos

Examples of badge-style logos.

You Can Hire a Professional, Too

And if you’re going to insist on spending money here, you probably should. No, but really, LogoMaker offers custom logo designs with “revisions until it looks right” at a reasonable price. I’d just ask to see examples of their custom logo work, because if the custom logos look like the logo templates, I wouldn’t bother.

It Offers Domain Names and Websites

If you need a website to go with your logo, LogoMaker sells both do-it-yourself (presumably template-based) and custom-designed websites. It also sells domain names (i.e., armadillohusbandry.com), because at this point… why not? But again, if their websites look like their logos…

You Can Get Your Logo Printed on Things

So you bought a logo, against all medical, aesthetic, and religious advice. Fine. Well, you can go ahead and get your logo printed on multiple things, including business cards, t-shirts, polos, pens, mugs, notebooks, and more. Oh, and stationery, if that’s your thing.

My Experience with LogoMaker

As usual for the reviews with videos, you can see the basic process all there. I followed the wizard, I bought the logo, and I was disappointed. And I’m sad to have to tell you this because there’s quite a bit that LogoMaker does right.

Filtering through the logo options is easy (as long as you know what you’re looking for). You get fine control over your layout, and you can select your base layout at the beginning. Everything is pretty customizable. LogoMaker does a lot of basic, quality-of-life things right when some competitors won’t do them at all.

On the other hand, sadly, the user interface felt quite clunky at times, the whole website felt dated as hell, and well… you know… the logos. The icons. No amount of good quality-of-life features can make up for the fact that the website produces mediocre designs at best. Despite all my snark, and despite all my jokes, I take no pleasure in telling you this.

And it’s not likely to get better. It would have to replace over 10,000 logo design templates.

Here’s the one I made. I’m so sorry you have to see this.

Website Planet logo, created with LogoMaker

Ease of use

3.5
LogoMaker

Hooray, I Get to Say Some Nice Things!

Now, if you watch the video, you’ll know that I ran into a few points of frustration while navigating the website itself, but I’m going to start with the good stuff. You know, before I tell you why you should give your money to some other service that does it better, such as Tailor Brands or Wix Logo Maker.

Oops. Spoilers. I’m sure no one saw that coming.

The user interface is mostly easy to navigate, with everything in the wizard being clearly defined, and things all over the website being generally well-explained. The editor is mostly self-explanatory and easy to learn by clicking around. You can try out the logo maker without committing to anything, but you do have to sign up to save your logos.

You Can Save Your Projects (But the Process Is a Little Flawed)

So here’s the most important ease-of-use feature: can you save your logos to purchase them, or keep working on them later? Yes. Logos get saved even if you don’t follow the whole “saving process” in the UI. The only thing I don’t like is that once you click Save if you haven’t signed up yet, there’s no way to stop the website from sending you along to the next screen.

Even the “X” button in the modal window (sort of like a pop-up window, but not technically) sends you to the next step in the process, instead of sending you back, as you’d expect.

LogoMaker

The “X” is a lie!

The Editor Provides Fine Control (But Is a Little Clunky)

So yeah, the editor. I said it’s mostly self-explanatory, and that’s true. It’s also the first online logo maker I can remember that lets me use the arrow keys to adjust the position of elements on the “canvas.” I love that feature. Plus, it has the usual snap-objects-to-other-objects feature, and a nice background grid to help you line things up.

I just wish I could see the objects move as I click and drag them, or resize them with the mouse.

Filtering Logo Options Is Easy Enough (Nothing Bad to Say Here)

Okay, so there aren’t a bunch of super-detailed filters, but if you know what you want, just type in your keywords. From there, you can adjust the search to include additional logo styles, layouts, and font styles. It’s very simple but very effective.

 

Support

1.7
LogoMaker

Well, They Answered Me Once...

Support from LogoMaker is like a demonic Dalmatian; it’s spotty as all hell. Firstly, there’s the knowledge base, which contains generally useful information, and answers most questions that you’re likely to have. Great, right?

Well… I noticed that at least some of the information was outdated. In particular, the section on payment methods mentions services that are not available when you actually go to, you know, pay. Also, they don’t include any information on refund policies, or anything like that.

Secondly, we have the ticket support system:

Tickets

I almost didn’t get to write about this at all. I sent in three questions over the course of three days and only had one answered. First, I asked whether there was a way to see their invoices online, as opposed to just keeping the email around forever. Turns out there is, I just missed the link that was included with the invoice email.

Then I asked about their refund policy, which I specified was “just for future reference.” No response.

Lastly, I asked them about something that had nothing to do with their logo service whatsoever. I asked them whether their domain name service supported some of the more obscure top-level domains. (The “.com” bit of a domain name is known as a “top-level domain”. They keep adding new ones to the Internet, like “.works”, or “.design”.)

Turns out they mostly do:

 

LogoMaker support email - screenshot

All in all, I was disappointed in my support experience.

Pricing

5.0

There are only two plans. The Basic package actually gives you just about everything you need, including files for use on the web and print. All the formats I listed earlier in the article? They’re in the Basic package. The Premium package gets you unlimited logo edits for one year, multiple logo layouts, and logo files for Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

All in all, I have to say that both packages are fairly generous for their prices, and a lot of other logo generators offer less while asking for more money. It’s just too bad about the logos.

You can pay these low, low prices via PayPal, Mastercard, and Visa. It also shows the American Express and Discover logos, but doesn’t actually give me the option of picking them in the payment form so… those icons are probably outdated. All payments are one-time unless of course, you bought a domain or a website.

You cannot download a free sample, and there is no cheaper plan for non-commercial use.

Usage Rights

You own your logo, fully and without reservation. Well, the template stays on the website, obviously, but you can use the logo for whatever you like.

Basic

$39.95
/ one-time fee
  • High-Resolution files
  • Logo Source file
  • Logo color variations
Get Started

Premium

$59.9
/ one-time fee
  • Number of revisions: Unlimited for 1 year
  • Social media design
  • High-Resolution files
  • Logo Source file
  • Logo color variations
Get Started

Bottom line on LogoMaker

It’s not the worst logo maker out there, but that’s not exactly a ringing endorsement, is it? It makes me sad because it has a lot of the right ideas, just mediocre execution. You’d be better off grabbing a logo from any number of their competitors.

Check out our reviews of Wix Logo Maker and Looka, which you can use to create a high-quality logo on your own – and for free.

Ezequiel Bruni
Ezequiel Bruni
Ezequiel Bruni is biologically Canadian, legally Mexican, and self identifies as a total nerd. He's been a web and experience designer off and on since he was a teenager, and loves sharing the kind of beginner's advice he really wishes he'd had when he first started. He also loves video games, tacos, open source software, video games, sci-fi and fantasy in all their forms, and video games. He does not love writing in the third person.
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